October 1, 2022

FLYING ARROW ARCHERY TOXIC AND CYCLONE BROAD-HEAD REVIEW

Article Written By: Tim Collins,

Good afternoon everyone, I am pleased to say today’s product review is for the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic broad-head and their new broad-head the Cyclone. I have to admit that I have always been intrigued about the Toxic broad-head but a bit skeptical about broad-heads with “spiral” technology. I also need to comment that I have not been able to test the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic and Cyclone broad-heads where it really matters, and that would be on game. Hopefully this fall I will be lucky enough to get the opportunity to write a follow-up review with how the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic and Cyclone broad-heads performed in harvesting a deer. With that said, here is what I determined when testing the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic and Cyclone broad-heads.

Flying-Arrow-Archery-reviewTo begin with, I just love their marketing {Internet marketing geek showing through}. The packaging of the broad-heads are also complimentary. Each Flying Arrow Archery Toxic and Cyclone broad-head comes packed in its own protective bubble that retains the broad-head in place even when you open the package. You simply need to remove the back protective piece that holds the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic and Cyclone broad-head secure to retrieve them from its bubble. This may seem trivial but I remember opening packages and having the broad-head jump out and falling all over the place. Not only is it annoying, but it is dangerous and could also lead to the broad-head getting dull if it falls on certain surfaces. You spend too much money on broad-heads to have that happen. Each broad-head package comes with its own broad-head wrench since their designs are unconventional and you won’t have one that will work on them. The wrench is also very solid and heavy metal, no cheap plastic that is made for any possible broad-head combination that you need to guess which slots fit yours. Another great thing about the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic and Cyclone broad-heads are that they offer replacement blades for a little more than half the price of a completely new package of broad-heads. The one thing I would suggest is for Flying Arrow Archery to include a practice broad-head with their Toxic and Cyclone packages. This would save the 3-pack of broad-heads for hunting instead of sacrificing one for target practice.

broad-head-reviewOn the Flying Arrow Archery website they claim that the Toxic and Cyclone broad-heads were designed to not worry about your vanes or the traditional thought of blade to vane placement for accurate arrow flight. With that said I simply took out one of each broad-head and screwed them on an arrow without worry about alignment to test their theory. They were either going to be correct or I was going to have some ugly arrows flying around. Because of this I tested the broad-heads at an undisclosed location in the middle of no-where just in case. I am pleased to announce that both the Toxic and the Cyclone flew just as accurate as the field point did. So yes, you can simply screw on your Flying Arrow Archery Toxic or Cyclone broad-head to your arrow and not worry about your vane off-set or lining them up.

When I shot the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic and Cyclone broad-heads not only was I looking for arrow flight, but I was also checking for penetration and how well they came out of the target. Call me skeptical but I really thought that when removing the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic and Cyclone broad-heads from the target I thought they would be difficult and possibly break. My thought was especially true for the Cyclone. As far as penetration goes, the Toxic broad-head had better penetration than the field point and the Cyclone. The Cyclone broad-head only had penetration equal to the field point. Granted this was into a target and not an animal, but apples are apples and oranges are oranges. So I was not pleased when the Flying Arrow Archery Cyclone broad-head did not have more penetration than the field point. When pulling the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic and Cyclone broad-heads out of the target I was pleasantly surprised. Both the Toxic and Cyclone broad-heads came out of the target rather easily. Of coarse with any broad-head there is more resistance than field points but it was no-where near the nightmare I was thinking before shooting them. Now all broad-heads are going to pull out “stuffing” when removing them from your target. The Flying Arrow Archery Cyclone broad-head pulled out less than I expected while the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic broad-head pulled out more than I thought it would. This is probably due to the unique design of the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic broad-head. Left a big ol’ hole in the target. For this reason I would suggest you only shoot the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic broad-head very sparingly at your target. On the flip side, I can’t wait to see what the wound channel looks like on a deer from the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic broad-head. Flying Arrow Archery has done several different tests and posted them on their website about the Toxic broad-head and I suggest you visit them, many links in this article for ease, and check them out. I have a feeling that if lucky enough to connect on a deer this fall I am going to be very happy with the track job.

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In conclusion, I highly recommend the Flying Arrow Archery Toxic and Cyclone broad-heads. They are strong and well built with us the customer in mind. They fly true and hold up well. I know they will be on my arrows and in my quiver come this fall. If the Flying Arrow Archery broad-heads perform as well as I think they will on game, then they will become my broad-head of choice from now on. Thank you for taking the time to read my review. If you liked this review then I encourage you to share it with friends.

Have a great day and happy hunting!
Tim Collins.